How Botox can boost elastin in your face

Botox is an effective anti-aging treatment, and is probably the most common cosmetic treatment in the US. We know that botox can reduce the appearance of dynamic wrinkles across the forehead, and at the corner of the eyes, but can it also improve the elasticity of the skin. Recent studies suggest that it can. So let’s find out just how botox can boost the elastin in your face.

The findings of a recent study out of Canada, suggest that botox may have long-term benefits for the skin. The research which was carried out by Dr. James P. Bonaparte (University of Ottawa), and Dr. David Ellis (University of Toronto), indicate that botox positively affects elasticity. The researchers noted that botox positively impacts both the pliability and elasticity (ability to recoil) of the skin.

The 43 women who completed the study were all given botox injections in the upper face. None of them had previously received botox injections. All the women had their skin assessed before and after the botox injections, using a device known as a ‘Cutometer.’  The Cutometer is used by plastic surgeons to measure changes in skin elasticity.

At the expiration of the 4 month study, all the women experienced an increase in the elasticity of their skin, which made their skin appear more youthful. The period of the changes in skin elasticity paralleled the duration of the effect of botox.  The study was published in the JAMA Facial and Plastic Surgery, and can be viewed online at http://archfaci.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2293061.

Botox injections are available from Cobb Wellness & Aesthetics, Roswell, GA. If you are interested in learning more about how botox can boost skin elasticity, call (770) 649-0094, and schedule a consultation with Dr. Linda Kelley.

You can erase bothersome wrinkles with Botox

Erase Wrinkles with Botox

Botox is a wonderful anti-aging solution that works fast, and is very effective. You can erase fine lines and wrinkles with Botox in as little as 15 minutes, to restore a more youthful appearance. Men and women who are bothered by their wrinkles can have botox done safely, to refresh and rejuvenate the face. But how does Botox work?

How Botox erases wrinkles
Botox is a neurotoxic protein, and it is a particularly effective treatment for lines across the forehead, as well as crow’s feet (lines at the corner of the eyes). It can also reduce the appearance of the furrows between the eyebrows.

These lines are formed because of the contraction of the underlying muscles, a sensation that occurs hundreds of times each day. Botox blocks the neurotransmitter that travels from the nerves to the muscles, and signals the muscles to contract.

Very small doses of Botox are injected into the muscles. This significantly reduces the contraction of the muscles, which in turn causes the wrinkles to soften, and eventually fade. The effects of botox will set in about 5-7 days after the injections, and the smoothing results can last anywhere from 3 to 6 months.

Do botox injections hurt?
Botox injections are not usually very painful, but topical anesthesia is available for those patients that cannot tolerate any pain. Some patients may feel a slight tingling, especially when the injections are being done on the muscles between the eyebrows.

In order to achieve the best quality results, Botox must be injected by an experienced physician, who will accurately determine how much Botox you need. Dr. Heather Rocheford of Rocheford Plastic Surgery in Woodbury, MN offers treatment for patients who want to erase unwanted wrinkles with Botox. You can learn more online at http://www.drrocheford.com/.

Can Botox Effectively Treat Excess Sweating?

Botox is well-known as an anti-wrinkle treatment, but can botox treat excess sweating? The simple answer is yes. Although botox is now widely regarded as the best way to eliminate facial wrinkles, a lesser known fact is that it is also used to provide relief for individuals who sweat excessively.

Sweating is a normal bodily function that everyone experiences, but there are individuals that sweat beyond the normal levels necessary to cool the body. This condition is known as hyperhidrosis. It is generally characterized by abnormal sweating, especially under the armpits, but it can also occur in the palms of the hands, as well as the feet.

Excessive sweating can be so chronic, that it causes those who suffer from it to be extremely embarrassed, making them avoid social contact. Abnormal sweating is often spontaneous and not the result of stress, heat, or physical activity.

In an effort to find relief, many people with hyperhidrosis often turn to anti-perspirants, salves, or ointments to dry up the sweat glands. However, in some cases, surgical alternatives such as the removal of the sweat glands, or severing of the sympathetic nerves that signal the sweat glands, may be necessary.

How can botox treat excess sweating? 

It is now possible to treat excessive sweating with Botox. Botox is a neurotoxin protein that is derived from botulinum toxin. It normally works to block muscle spasms, and performs a similar function when used for hyperhidrosis.

Botox has been FDA cleared for the treatment of abnormal underarm sweating, so it can be safely used. Treatment involves the injection of a small amount of botox into the armpits, using a very small needle. When botox is injected into the underarm area, it blocks the signals to the sweat glands. The procedure takes about 15 minutes to complete.

Patients in Pinole should expect a significant reduction in sweating after treatment, and this should last for up to 6 months. Follow up treatment will be required after that time. There are no significant side effects to the botox injections.

Botox may not be appropriate for everyone with hyperhidrosis, so it is important to check with your physician to find out if treatment is right for you. Many people only know botox for freezing foreheads, but now you know that it can also treat hyperhidrosis. Although botox can treat excess sweating, it is usually recommended only in cases where topical agents have failed.